Frederick Douglass, Thomas Merton, and Isaiah

They seek me day after day
and desire to know my ways,
as if there were a nation that does what is just.
Isaiah 58: 2

 It is so easy to think that we are the chosen ones, the just ones, the ones whom God has set apart.

It is so easy for nations to act as if they are doing God’s will. I’ve seen it in the US and I see it here in Honduras. God is called upon to justify the policies of a political party or a government. Here political leaders show up for the feast of Our Lady of Suyapa, the patroness of the country. Last year the president announced that the government was giving the church a radio station – at the Mass in the basilica.

But God is not to be mocked. God is beyond our petty political machinations and our desires to justify our policies – whether personal or political.

Do we really live as God wishes?

Isaiah clearly calls Israel to real change, to the real fasting of liberating the oppressed, sharing our bread with the hungry, sheltering the homeless, and more.

But how do we really live? Frederick Douglass, who died on February 20, 1895, once said:

Between the Christianity of this land, and the Christianity of Christ, I recognize the widest possible difference – so wide, that to receive the one as good, pure, and holy, is of necessity to reject the other as bad, corrupt and wicked…I can see no reason, but the most deceitful one, for calling the religion of this land Christianity.

Are we a people who really live the way of Christ, as expressed in Isaiah 58 and n Matthew 25?

Or do we deceive ourselves by relying on our public prayers and fasting as ways to try to placate God?

Do we trust more in our wealth and power than in the works of mercy?

I think Thomas Merton was right when he wrote

“It seems to me that there are very dangerous ambiguities about our democracy in its actual present condition. I wonder to what extent our ideals are now a front for organized selfishness and systematic irresponsibility. If our affluent society ever breaks down and the facade is taken away, what are we going to have left?”

Will we be a people who fast from injustice – and not just from meat and chocolate?

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One response to “Frederick Douglass, Thomas Merton, and Isaiah

  1. I just came across another quote of Frederick Douglass:
    “Between the Christianity of this land, and the Christianity of Christ, I recognize the widest possible difference — so wide, that to receive the one as good, pure, and holy is of necessity to reject the other as bad, corrupt, and wicked. I love the pure, peaceable, and impartial Christianity of Christ; I therefore hate the corrupt, slaveholding, women-whipping, cradle-plundering, partial and hypocritical Christianity of this land. Indeed, I can see no reason, but the most deceitful one, for calling the religion of this land Christianity.

    (Thanks to Shane Claibourne.)

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